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What is the glycemic index of beer?

The glycemic index of beer is subject of a heated debate: The values you can find on various websites vary considerably. But what is the correct value? The answer is a lot more complex than you'd think.

Beer glycemic index
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The role of fructose in the development of gout

Uric acid and its salts, known as urates, are an end-product of the metabolism that is excreted with the urine. Unfortunately, urates are poorly soluble in water. In contrast to other mammals, humans don't have enzymes to convert them into more soluble compounds. Therefore, the human uric acid level is very high in comparison – it is just below the physical solubility limit.

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When does restricting your diet make sense?

If you suffer from food intolerances, certain constituents of the food may be responsible for a broad variety of symtoms. The obvious conclusion would be to cut all foods from the diet, that contain these constituents. However, such an avoidance strategy also carries risks.

restricted diet
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Sugars: A small compendium

If you suffer from certain kinds of carbohydrate malabsorption you are often confronted with names of chemical compounds – it is often very easy to become confused. Therefore, we put together a small compendium that can be used, whenever needed.


Simple sugars


GlucoseGlucose
Glucose, a simple sugar; is the most important energy source in humans. It is readily absorbed in the small intestine. It is also known as grape sugar, corn sugar or dextrose.
Fructose FODMAPFructose
Fructose is a simple sugar that is slowly absorbed in the small intestine. The absorption rate is highest when equal amounts of glucose and fructose are present. When the amount of excess fructose is too high, fructose can reach the colon where it is fermented by bacteria.
GalactoseGalactose
Galactose is a simple sugar that occurs in foods like dairy products. In the small intestine, galactose is transported by the same carriers as glucose, therefore, the absorption is very fast.
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How can vegetarians use the app Natural food guide to improve their omega-3 status?

The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids can mainly be contributed to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Unfortunately, those two fats almost exclusively occur in fatty sea fish and to a smaller degree in meat. So how can vegetarians meet their needs for these essential fats?

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In principle, our body is able to produce these important fatty acids on its own from the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA), which serves as a precursor. Read More...

What is the average intake of omega-3 in different regions of the world?

A number of studies point out that the intake of the long-chained omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in big parts of the population is too low. These fatty acids are very interesting because they play a decisive role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends the combined intake of 500 mg/day of both fatty acids. However, it is not necessary to eat fish on a daily basis, it is also possible to meet the needs with one or two servings of fish per week.

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Why is too much salt bad for our health?

The excessive ingestion of salt has been known to be a risk factor in the development of high blood pressure for decades. There is compelling evidence from a multitude of studies indicating a relation of high sodium intake, high blood pressure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand low salt diets exhibit a blood pressure lowering effect. But what is the reason for this? Which factors cause the rise in blood pressure?

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Scientists of the University of Otago in New Zealand decided to bring light into this issue. They argued that if a salt restricted diet lowers the high blood pressure of affected individuals, an increased salt intake should cause a rise of the blood pressure. Accompanying a low sodium diet 35 participants either received tomato juice rich or low in sodium for several weeks. Read More...

Do you know how much fructose you are eating?

From a historical point of view, fruits and honey were the only fructose-rich foods in our diet. In the 17th century the average sugar intake of each person was as low as 5 g per day. Big changes of dietary habits only occurred after the industrial scale production of sugar from sugar cane, sugar beets and the introduction of high-fructose corn syrup. Suddenly sugar was available in large quantities and at low costs.

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