FAQ

What is the glycemic index of beer?

The glycemic index of beer is subject of a heated debate: The values you can find on various websites vary considerably. But what is the correct value? The answer is a lot more complex than you'd think.

Beer glycemic index
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How can vegetarians use the app Natural food guide to improve their omega-3 status?

The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids can mainly be contributed to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Unfortunately, those two fats almost exclusively occur in fatty sea fish and to a smaller degree in meat. So how can vegetarians meet their needs for these essential fats?

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In principle, our body is able to produce these important fatty acids on its own from the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA), which serves as a precursor. Read More...

What is the average intake of omega-3 in different regions of the world?

A number of studies point out that the intake of the long-chained omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in big parts of the population is too low. These fatty acids are very interesting because they play a decisive role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends the combined intake of 500 mg/day of both fatty acids. However, it is not necessary to eat fish on a daily basis, it is also possible to meet the needs with one or two servings of fish per week.

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Why is too much salt bad for our health?

The excessive ingestion of salt has been known to be a risk factor in the development of high blood pressure for decades. There is compelling evidence from a multitude of studies indicating a relation of high sodium intake, high blood pressure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand low salt diets exhibit a blood pressure lowering effect. But what is the reason for this? Which factors cause the rise in blood pressure?

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Do you know how much fructose you are eating?

From a historical point of view, fruits and honey were the only fructose-rich foods in our diet. In the 17th century the average sugar intake of each person was as low as 5 g per day. Big changes of dietary habits only occurred after the industrial scale production of sugar from sugar cane, sugar beets and the introduction of high-fructose corn syrup. Suddenly sugar was available in large quantities and at low costs.

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